Sanders for Congress - Keep Hope Alive!

Visit Indiana, Kentucky For Your Next Vacation?
If you live in the Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio region of America, you really do owe it to yourself to make a little trip to Nashville, Indiana sometime in the near future. Nicknamed the "Little Smokies", and referred to by most of us as "Brown County", this thriving artist community is located about an hour from Indianapolis. This time of the year, the trip is especially worth it due to the gorgeous jewel tones of the autumn leaves.

Why Do US Media Ignore Secret UK Government Memo On A Mega Iraq War Conspiracy?
The blogosphere has been jumping around the story like crazy but it seems the mainstream media are doing their best to ignore it. Yet it's been branded the most extensive case of governing-level conspiracy plotting in ages.

Election Season Could Be A Boost For Maine Business
Two young women from Maine are hoping to have their business take off during Election season. Electoral College Sportswear & Accessories and Intellectual Threads are run by Andrea Duquette (24) and Ashley Perry (23) of Bangor, Maine. Electoral College Sportswear & Accessories sells novelty clothing for the fictitious Electoral College.

Political Maverick Ravi Singh Named Rising Star in Campaign and Election Industry
ElectionMall.com's CEO Ravi Singh, an Asian American Sikh, honored with prestigious Rising Star award from Campaign & Election Magazine. A pioneer in campaign and election technology, Singh overcame many obstacles as an Asian American Sikh in the American political industry.

Fifty Years, Three Continents: A Renowned Pediatrician Remembers His Life in Iran and Beyond
"Over the past fifty years, I have served as pediatrician to Royalty and the world's wealthiest families, the kind you see on magazine covers, as well as to the poorest people on Earth, the kind you see late at night, on television." So says Ralph Salimpour M.D., D.C.H., F.A.A.P. in his just-published memoir, Silent River, Empty Night: Diary of a Pediatrician in Iran, which encompasses his personal and professional life, as well as his experiences during the revolution in Iran.

Business After The Iraqi War



The rewarding of high compensation packages to top executives who turned over weak quarterly earnings, or who were involved in corporate scandals, adversely affected short-term investing, and collectively contributed to the downturn of the global economy over the last couple of years. Even the help and expertise of Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan and several notable Nobel Prize winning economists in the President's Council of Economic Advisers, wasn't enough to revive the economy. September 11 then turned our attention towards terrorist threats against the markets.

Many, including the Bush administration, believed that a short war was the answer to both of these enormous problems. That is, if done quickly, a war would induce an increase in government spending that will be injected into the economy and a multiplier effect will, in turn, create jobs for the unemployed. But now that it's over and coalition forces have taken control of Iraq, should we expect to return to business as usual? Unfortunately, this is easier said than done.

The facts are that the underlying and axiomatic problems are still present in the global economy. First and foremost, we have America's account deficit, which is increasing by the second. The cost of the war is certainly adding to this burden and is currently hovering at approximately $20 billion dollars. Some experts say that this cost could reach up to $95 billion dollars. We, inevitably, will have to pick up the majority of this bill.

The United States' Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is also not in good shape. It has trickled down to an annual GDP growth that is expected to reach only 3.1% and both France and Germany have recently downgraded their annual GDP growth forecasts to 2.4% and 2.0% respectively. Moreover, the "uncertainty factor" as I like to call it, most likely will keep businesses and consumers cutting back on expenditures for the remainder of 2003.

Fortunately, there are some signs that the economy is beginning to recover. A report that was recently released by the U.S. Department of Commerce showed a rise of over 2% in retail sales for the month of March and a slight rebound in consumer confidence. Also, the national unemployment rate, which was released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, remained unchanged at 5.8% for March 2003. While the majority consensus is that the economy will eventually recover, it is apparent that this will definitely take more time and effort than what most people had originally predicted.

Carlos T. Fernandez is the business columnist for Dominican Times Magazine, a publication that focuses on the hispanic culture and the issues affecting its communities. He is also the publisher of a popular financial planning and management website entitled Building Wealth (http://buildingwealth.blogspot.com).

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